PhotoPOSTcard: Jumping With Joy

While the adult men in the Maasai Village in Kenya were performing their traditional jumping dance for us, off to the side, these little boys were practicing and jumping along. When they saw my camera pointing at them, they put even more energy and exuberance into the act, and giving me the biggest smiles possible at the same time.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose

PhotoPOSTcard: Waiting

On my recent visit to Kenya, I had the chance to visit a Maasai Village again. After the dancing demonstration and the tour of a Maasai mud home, we had the chance to shop in the crafts hut and to make purchases. We browsed the many items made by the members of the village and made our purchases, negotiating with one of the younger men in the village who spoke very good English.  Outside of the enclosed hut, the women looked on in anticipation, waiting to see if one of the items they made was going to be sold and so provide some extra income for her and her children.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose

PhotoPOSTcard: Double Vision

I’ve always wondered – are zebras white with black stripes or black with white stripes? Zebras often stand together nose to tail like this so that they have a full 360 degree view for potential predators.

Please note that my visit to Kenya was hosted by Biosphere Expeditions. All content is my own.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose

PhotoPOSTcard: Resting Eland

The diversity of different types of antelope species in the Mara area of Kenya is astounding. At first glance, they all look very much alike, but after a few days of looking at the wildlife, it gets easier to distinguish them apart. The body size, the markings and especially the horn size and shape makes each species completely unique. Here,  an eland, which is on of the largest of the antelope species,  relaxes in the early morning sun.

My trip to the Enonkishu Conservancy was hosted by Biospheres Expeditions. All content is my own.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose

PhotoPOSTcard: Piggy Love

I think warthogs are kind of cute, in a gruff way. As these two approached each other at a full gallop, I thought they were going to fight, but instead, they greeted each other with familiarity and love, nuzzling each other with great joy. And the rain did not bother them one bit either.

My trip to the Enonkishu Conservancy in Kenya’s Maasai Mara was hosted by Biosphere Expeditions. All Content is my own.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose

PhotoPOSTcard: A Living Dinosaur

Is there anything more prehistoric looking than a Nile Crocodile?  This big guy was sunning himself on the banks of the Mara River just below our camp in the Enonkishu Conservancy. Fortunately, there was a 15 foot straight drop between us and the croc so I had no worries about becoming his dinner. I could just admire him from afar – which is exactly how I liked it.

My trip to the Enonkishu Conservancy in Kenya’s Maasai Mara was hosted by Biosphere Expeditions. All Content is my own.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose

 

PhotoPOSTcard: How to Feed a Baby Zebra

This little zebra eagerly nursed while its mother stood patiently by, waiting for her baby to get its fill – much like my little grandson back home.

My trip to the Enonkishu Conservancy in Kenya’s Maasai Mara was hosted by Biosphere Expeditions. All Content is my own.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose

PhotoPOSTcard: My Name is Thomson

Of all the antelope species grazing in the Maasai Mara grasslands, the Thomson’s gazelles (or Tommies) are the easiest to spot because of the black stripe on each side. They are very prolific, yet I never tired of seeing them. With the stripe that almost looks like a lopsided smile and their bouncy gait when they run, they seemed like such a happy looking animal that always made me smile. Tommies can run up to 50-55 miles per hour-they have to be fast to try and stay ahead of a cheetah, their primary predator.

My trip to the Enonkishu Conservancy in Kenya’s Maasai Mara was hosted by Biosphere Expeditions. All Content is my own.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose

PhotoPOSTcard: I Love You Mom

One of the things I loved about my recent trip to the Enonkishu Conservancy in the Maasai Mara area of Kenya was the opportunity to observe animals socializing in their natural habitat. I was especially surprised by the affection I observed between mates of various species and between the mothers and their young.

My trip to the Enonkishu Conservancy in Kenya was hosted by Biosphere Expeditions. All Content is my own.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose

PhotoPOSTcard: The Circle of Life

In Kenya’s Mara ecosystem, a baby Thomson’s gazelle gives up its life to extend the life of a black-backed jackal. The jackal is part of the same animal family that also contains wolves, coyotes and dogs. It is a monogamous species whose pups stay with the family to help raise the next generations.

My trip to the Enonkishu Conservancy in Kenya was hosted by Biosphere Expeditions. All Content is my own.

Thanks for visiting.

Rose